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The Definitive Guide to Acupuncture Points, Chris Jarmeym, Ilaira Bouratinos, Lynn Pearce

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A comprehensive reference guide to locating and treating nearly 400 acupoints throughout the body

• Explores in precise detail the acupuncture points of the 12 main channels/meridians, plus the conception and governor vessels

• Explains the theory of acupuncture from both traditional Chinese and Western medical perspectives with maps of the body

• Full-color throughout and abundantly illustrated

A complete reference atlas of acupuncture and acupressure points, this newly updated guide by renowned shiatsu, qigong, and bodywork teacher Chris Jarmey and acupuncturists Ilaria Bouratinos and Lynn Pearce illustrates how to best locate and treat nearly 400 acupoints throughout the body. Lavishly illustrated with full-color examples, this updated fourth edition offers comparisons of Eastern and Western teaching models as well as new theoretical material to help instill intuitive understanding for students and early practitioners of acupuncture. Více...

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The Definitive Guide to Acupuncture Points

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The Definitive Guide to Acupuncture Points, Chris Jarmeym, Ilaira Bouratinos, Lynn Pearce

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Podrobný popis The Definitive Guide to Acupuncture Points, Chris Jarmeym, Ilaira Bouratinos, Lynn Pearce

• Explores in precise detail the acupuncture points of the 12 main channels/meridians, plus the conception and governor vessels

• Explains the theory of acupuncture from both traditional Chinese and Western medical perspectives with maps of the body

• Full-color throughout and abundantly illustrated

A complete reference atlas of acupuncture and acupressure points, this newly updated guide by renowned shiatsu, qigong, and bodywork teacher Chris Jarmey and acupuncturists Ilaria Bouratinos and Lynn Pearce illustrates how to best locate and treat nearly 400 acupoints throughout the body. Lavishly illustrated with full-color examples, this updated fourth edition offers comparisons of Eastern and Western teaching models as well as new theoretical material to help instill intuitive understanding for students and early practitioners of acupuncture.

The first part of the book, “Theory,” describes the essence of acupuncture from both traditional Chinese and Western medical perspectives with chapters on needling considerations, the principles of locating acupoints, and myotome, dermatome, viscerotome, and sclerotome maps of the body. The second part, “Practice,” then guides the reader methodically through acupuncture points of the 12 main channels/meridians, plus the conception and governor vessels and additional non-channel points. The locations of nearly 400 points are described in precise detail and clearly illustrated through color diagrams, along with explanations of each point’s actions, indications, and contraindications.

Honoring the traditional Eastern roots of acupuncture in parallel with modern approaches of Western medicine, this book is an essential resource for practitioners of all levels seeking to deepen their understanding of working with acupoints.

About the Author

Chris Jarmey (1954-2008) taught shiatsu, qigong, bodywork therapy, and anatomy and founded the European Shiatsu School. He was the author of many books on anatomy and bodywork, including The Concise Book of Muscles and Shiatsu: The Complete Guide. Ilaira Bouratinos founded the Oriental Medicine and Shiatsu Training Centre in Athens in 1994. She teaches acupuncture, shiatsu, and other bodywork methods, both in Greece and internationally. She is based in Athens, Greece. Lynn Pearce, an acupuncture clinician for more than 30 years, is an accredited lecturer within the Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists (AACP). Trained in both Western and Chinese medical models, she studied at the British College of Acupuncture. She lives in the U.K.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

From Chapter 5: Classification of Points

All the body’s points may be divided into two broad categories: those whose location and functions have been precisely charted and described, known as fixed points or classified points, and those that have not been charted, known as transient points.

The first broad category includes all the channel and non-channel points. The channel points have been grouped into various categories according to their energetic quality and the areas, substances and types of condition they treat. The main categories of these points are discussed later in this chapter.

The non-channel points (also known as extra, or miscellaneous points) include both the traditional extra points, mapped out thousands of years ago, and other more recently discovered ones, called new points. They are used in the treatment of specific conditions or body areas.

The second broad category, the transient points, are points that can be found anywhere on the body, since their locations vary. They can also appear and disappear because they are an immediate reflection of the particular disharmony and its relationship to the person. The functions and locations of these points are inherently unchartable.

Transient points can be found as reactive points along the channel pathways or other specific areas worked on during a treatment that uses palpatory therapeutic techniques (such as shiatsu). They can also appear anywhere else on the body. Transient points can also be found in the form of pain points, known as Ashi points (meaning ‘that’s it’/‘ouch’ in Chinese). Ashi points are found anywhere there is pain, tenderness or other abnormal sensation, manifesting either on palpation or spontaneously. They are generally used to treat pain conditions and their local area, but are also effective in other cases. Pain should be diminished after treatment. All active trigger points are Ashi points, but it is important to realise that not all Ashi points are trigger points.

The Most Commonly Used Points

Here are two informal lists of those points that seem to be used the most often in clinical practice.

The Top Most Commonly Used Points

LI 4 and ST 36 and LR 3 seem to rank number one in terms of popularity of use, which is supported by a growing body of research encompassing these particular points.

Major points Back-shu points

1 LI 4 1 BL 25

2 ST 36 2 BL 23

3 SP 6 3 BL 18

4 LR 3 4 BL 17

5 KI 3 5 BL 15

6 GB 34 6 BL 13

7 PC 6

8 HT 7

9 GV 20

10 GV 14

11 GV 4 DG

The most commonly used points are important for a variety of reasons, including:

- They have a wider range of indications and are therefore used in more cases.

- They are very dynamic and powerful points having stronger therapeutic results than other points of the same channel or category.

- They are also chosen in many cases where the treatment principle and diagnosis are not clarified in detail, so that choosing such a point, even without a diagnosis, is more likely to be of benefit.

The Front-Mu Points

The front-mu points (called mu points in Chinese and bo points in Japanese), also known as alarm points, are located on the chest and the abdomen, and are related to their pertaining organs (see Fig. 5.1). It is here that the Qi of each internal organ converges and gathers. The front-mu points have an immediate and direct effect on the internal organs and are therefore used more often in acute conditions to treat the Yang organs.

They are also shown in Table 5.1.

The Back-Shu Points

The back-shu points (called shu points in Chinese and yu points in Japanese), also known as transporting points, are located on the back and are closely related anatomically (in the main) to the organ to which they send, or ‘transport’, Qi directly. They have a direct balancing effect on the internal organs and are used in both acute and chronic conditions, particularly when there is a depletion of the vital substances.

It is worthy of note that, anatomically, the position of these points and their target organ of influence show a considerable overlap with the sympathetic chain in the thoracic spine and extending down to L2. Obviously, when Chinese reasoning was in its infancy, there was no knowledge of the sympathetic chain, and its sphere of influence over the whole of the visceral organ system. This is one of the many examples where Western medicine is falling into line with established Chinese medical definitions.

The back-shu points also treat the orifices that pertain to their associated organ, and are shown in Chapter 14, page 208, and in Table 5.4, page 64.

The additional shu points (Table 5.2) are not directly related to the Zang Fu organs and are not traditionally considered to be part of the regular set of shu points. However, they have a special effect on their associated areas, body functions and psycho-emotional aspects and are often used effectively in treatment.

The Five Shu Points

On each of the 12 primary channels there are five shu points located distal to the elbows and knees, whose quality of Qi can be likened to the flow of water along its course, starting at a well and reaching a distant ocean (Fig. 5.2).

Each of these points (Table 5.5) has an individual energetic character that distinguishes the nature of the Qi flowing through it. This is irrespective of the other categories they may be grouped into. These points are also classified in relation to the five phases and are employed in the treatment of imbalances among the elements (Fig. 5.3). This is complex Chinese medical theory and not covered in this book.

The jing-well points are located at the distal ends of the 12 regular channels, at the tips of the fingers and toes. At these points, the Qi of the channels is at its most superficial, flowing rapidly in an outward direction. It is here that the polarity of Yin/Yang changes as the paired channels flow into one another.

The jing-well points have a powerful effect on the mind and are used for insomnia, anxiety and irritability, and to restore consciousness. They also activate the TM meridians and can be used in cases of pain and other channel disorders. On the Yin channels they are allocated to the Wood element, and on the Yang channels, to the Metal element.

The ying-spring points, the second points along the channels, are located at the base of the fingers and toes. The Qi here is likened to a swirling spring where the water gushes outwards. Their function is similar to that of the jing-well points insofar as the Qi here is dynamic and moves rapidly. Thus, the ying-spring points are used to clear pathogenic factors, particularly heat and fire. On the Yin channels they are allocated to the Fire element, and on the Yang channels, to the Water element.

The shu-stream points, the third points along the channels, are located on the wrists and ankles on the Yin channels, and on the dorsal aspect of the hands and feet on the Yang channels. The Qi, although still moving quickly, begins to enter a little deeper into the circulation and broadens out.

It is at these points that pathogens penetrate deeper into the channels and where the defensive Qi (Wei Qi) gathers to protect the interior of the body. On the Yin channels, the shu-stream points are primarily used to tonify and nourish the organs, and on the Yang channels, to expel pathogenic factors. On the Yin channels they are also yuan-source points (see below) and are allocated to the Earth element. On the Yang channels they pertain to Wood.

The jing-river points are located on the forearm and leg on the Yin channels and are allocated to the Metal element, whereas on the Yang channels they are found at the wrists and ankles and pertain to the Fire element. The Qi at the jing-river points flows like a strong current after coming a long way from its source. The Qi at these points is much bigger, wider and deeper, and it is here that pathogens enter into the joints, tendons and bones. The jing-river points are commonly used in the treatment of painful obstruction syndrome and arthritis.

The he-sea points, located at the elbows and knees, are where the Qi of the channel becomes deeper and joins the systemic circulation of the body, like a river flowing into the sea (‘he’ means ‘to unite’). The Qi at these points moves slowly inwards towards the pertaining organ. The he-sea points have a deeper but less immediate effect. They are used to harmonise the Qi of the internal organs in both acute and chronic conditions by clearing interior pathogenic factors and regulating the flow of Qi. Some are also important for tonifying the vital substances. On the Yin channels they are allocated to the Water element, and on the Yang channels, to the Earth element.

ST 37, ST 39 and BL 39 are three additional he-sea points, known as the lower he-sea points, one each for the Large Intestine, Small Intestine and Triple Energizer channels, respectively.

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Publisher ? : ? Healing Arts Press; 4th Edition, New (March 7, 2023)

Language ? : ? English

Paperback ? : ? 392 pages

ISBN-10 ? : ? 1644116235

ISBN-13 ? : ? 978-1644116234

Item Weight ? : ? 1.89 pounds

Dimensions ? : ? 7.44 x 0.8 x 9.69 inches

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